RGT introduce Trikes For The Disabled 🥰

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This is really fantastic. I wonder if the physics are the same or different than the recumbent hand-cycles (they had different drafting than the rest of the bikes in the game).

I hope RGT gets a lot of positive publicity for this, because I doubt the capacity for subscriptions from trike users comes close to offsetting the development costs.

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Hi Dan!!
Good to see you here! Yes I’m sure the physics will be different - there have had to be some changes on how to access these new bikes due to some inappropriate use :frowning:

So do I - and I’m hoping this gets shared far and wide! :smiling_face_with_three_hearts:

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This is interesting. Does this mean that hand cycles and other trikes are available in RGT now but you need special access to get them?

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Yes, you need a link to add them to your equipment list -

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Thank you for sharing my article. Honored by the opportunity to share the game changing advancement by Wahoo RGT and Project Echelon. Raising the bar for adaptive athlete inclusion and representation.

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they should adapt their wording, though. it’s not disabled riders, but riders with a disability.

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Funny thing here Dame Isi, I’ve worked in the field of vocational rehabilitation for pretty much my entire career (as well as having a personal/familial connection to disability my whole life) and language around how people with disabilities refer to themselves and how they prefer to have others refer to them has swung around a bit. Of course, it is still a personal preference of course and the community is no more homogenized in their beliefs than any other group but many people with disabilities will refer to themselves as disabled rather than a person with a disability.

Here’s a pretty decent article on the topic that I recalled reading from last year Why many advocates prefer the term 'disabled people' over 'people with disabilities' | CTV News

All that said, I think when people without disabilities refer to people with disabilities, unless they are asked otherwise, it is probably better to use people first language, as you suggest.

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OK, I get your point and I don’t agree. BUT… I googled it and found that there seem to be regional and cultural differences. so while in North America “disabled” people are completely fine with the term, in Europe and here in Germany we define as people with a disability. in fact, here in Germany calling someone disabled can be considered an absolute no-go. I do feel insulted if someone calls me that. I live - by legal definition - with a “severe disability” (grade 70, anything from 50 and above is legally considered as severe) and certain rights go with this) but I only feel “disabled” when I run into restrictions that are non-inclusive. similar to a wheelchair user who can’t get to the railway platform because there’s no elevator. so we’re being disabled (i.e. we’re not able) to take part in daily life at certain occasions and for certain reasons. there’s a complaints office that deals with these issues as a case of discrimination.
so yeah, interesting discussion with a lot of nuances but as a European I’ll stick with our definition as being a person with a disability :wink:

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What matters more is the intent behind the word rather than the word itself :smiling_face_with_three_hearts:.

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100% I will always default to person first language.

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Where is the accessible cycling link?

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So you have to ask for it. :slight_smile:

Tagging @RGT-FB-Moderator for you @James_Hubbard Also, welcome to the forums.

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Thank you

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Hmmm I thought I knew where the link was, but I can’t find it at the moment. I’ve reached out to some of my colleagues and will come back with a reply as soon as I get an answer.

I DMd you :slight_smile:

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Thanks! :grinning:

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Thank you for the help

I will wait to hear from you