Should I redo Half Monty

I just finished G.O.A.T. and in all the slow cadence uphill sustained sections my HR should have been in Zone 3 and 4 and I was in zone 2 the whole time. My heart rate actually would go up to 136 during the recovery at 90 rpm. I have experienced this in a few other work outs. On a few I started this way and half way through a workout I’m crawling home and if I’m lucky I just might get my mojo back in the last effort. I still think it was a good workout and I definitely feel it in my legs.

I’m thinking that I did my Half Monty after about one week of Wahoo and prior to that I was off the bike for about 5 weeks and had inconsistent riding prior to that too. Thinking that since I’m riding now at least 3 days a week for over a month my body may have adapted a bit and perhaps I may need new numbers for my workouts.

Why not? If you think it’s an issue. 1/2 Monty takes little to no prep, so it probably took you longer to think about your question and type it out than it would have taken to re-do it.

And if that’s not an/the issue, you still got a good workout in.

:wink:

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While you may certainly be fitter now, note that low cadence efforts are much easier on the cardiovascular system. This is why G.O.A.T. has a level 3 rating for NM.

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Low cadence = low heart rate and high cadence = high heart rate. Changing cadence is a sneaky trick to alternate resting the legs and resting the heart for the same power output. High cadence is supposed to be more efficient and quicker overall though.

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Normal to not hit the HR zones in workouts like GOAT and Power Station. Think of these like doing Leg day at the gym - dead lifts and squats don’t usually get your HR up. Low cadence grinds don’t either.

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A lot of workouts have the HR zones tied directly to your power zones. But if you’re not in the power zone long enough, or if you’re doing very low cadence work, then your HR may never get up into those zones.

But even then, your HR can vary widely based on fitness level, fatigue, sleep, time of day, how long you’ve been working out, cadence and a lot of other things. So as long as you’re hitting the correct power then the HR zone really doesn’t matter.

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Adding on! Time of day matters too. Your HR for a low cadence MAP effort at 5 am is likely to be lower than it would be at noon.

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The Sufferfest (Wahoo) science folks would agree and Sir Neal has said on more than one occasion that the heart rate targets on G.O.A.T. are incorrect. Nothing for the OP to worry about. Now, if you were doing The Omnium and your heart rate was low, you have possible overtraining or you are well rested.

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Or you’re about to die…just saying.

200

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I just did ISLAGIATT and that was a killer. My HR was still at least a zone below, but my legs are on fire so I’m not planning on changing anything soon. By the 3rd mountain I was toast and just crawling. At around 22 minutes I ran upstairs and too get some GU to just make it to the end. I literally crawled home. Interestingly, when the power went over threshold I was able to power through and increase my cadence. Not going to worry too much about HR zone at this point. I have a retest scheduled in about 2 weeks anyway.

Thanks to everyone who gave me feedback. I really appreciate it.

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Some days my heart rate runs in the zone and other days it stays a number of beats below. For short intervals, it rarely catches up. And for short recoveries, rarely settles all the way down. This is true for fitness tests too: depending on the day, I have about an 8 beat range where my threshold heart rate comes out. Consequently: I mostly ignore my heart rate providing that it moves up and down at about the right times.

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I try not to discuss things w people that require them to shell out $$$, but if you use Strava or something similar, you can track your fatigue levels over time, which strongly correlates w HR and can help you predict or avoid overtraining.

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I highly recommend picking up some sort of HRV program. I personally use Elite HRV, but there are many out there. It’s amazing that it picked up the possible start of a disease process as I slept (hard) 12 hours on Sunday. This moring’s reading was 8P and I was amazed. I did a short easy Yoga routine and seriously cut back on my Strength workout (lifting 10-15 pound bags of bread). Let’s see what tomorrow brings, but it’s nice to know that I wasn’t just imagining that I was having issues.

Since I was doing a mountain workout. It feels kind of funny that my heart rate didn’t reflect going up a mountain. My legs definitely felt it as I am taking about 2 to 3 days to recover. It feels like when I do my first hilly group ride and I did not build up to it.

I’ll check out a few HRV. In the meantime, it’s not a bad idea to schedule my yearly cardiologist visit.

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You might find this interesting coming from the Forum, but I, like you, are a heart patient. Here’s a question that you don’t and shouldn’t answer but keep in mind. What kind of heart drugs are you on? If you are on some of them, your heart rate will not be ‘normal’. Thus, you could be in Zone 2 and be just fine when the program says you should be in Zone 4. Some of them actually behave like a govener on your heart rate and you can’t go above a specific value, no matter how hard you try (and they are designed to act this way to prevent damage). As to your annual visit, I would say go forward with it. However, when you pay them a visit, let them know what you are doing and if any activities should outright be avoided or if you should continue on. My doctor said carry on but I will experience heart rate dimming issues. It takes quite a long time for my HR to be in Zone and sometimes I can’t even get there. I know this and so does my medical team.

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